Missions of the Reliant: Cleaning up the wreckage of the train crash

I’m back, and I didn’t give up on Missions! I’m sure there must be exactly one person out there who cares :-).

But seriously. I don’t have any new features to show at the moment, unfortunately. When I went to implement the laser cannon for the player, I realized I’d never be able to test it without something to fire at. I also realized the cannon itself would be useless without the target scanner since it has to lock onto a target. The scanner is also useless without something to scan. So, it was time to implement the base code for mobile enemies. Probably should’ve done that long ago, and here’s why…

As we all know, I’m using Objective-C to write this code. That means, among other things, that my code is object-oriented in nature. Up until this point, things like planets, starbases, and the player had all been entirely separate implementations. This is what Mike did with the original code. As always, what he did then was only sensible for the time and environment, but I can avoid a hell of a lot of code duplication by giving everything that exists in space a common superclass: a “Presence”. (Presences are themselves subclasses of the even more general “Responder”, which is used for everything that needs to process game happenings in any way, but that’s only a side note). As one can imagine, since I didn’t have the foresight to design the code this way to begin with, implementing it now required some significant refactoring.

Another issue cropped up halfway through the refactoring: The severe limitations of Apple’s built-in Key-Value Observing, which I use extensively throughout the code to avoid having to call “update this” and “update that” manually for every single affected object whenever something changes. For example, KVO doesn’t let you use blocks for callbacks, and if a superclass and a subclass both register for the same notification, there’s no way to manage the two independantly. Fortunately, Michael Ash noticed these problems some time back, and created a replacement, his MAKVONotificationCenter. Unfortunately, even the updated version published by Jerry Krinock didn’t do everything I needed, at least not in a way that I found usable with blocks added to the equation. Managing observations by tracking the resulting observation objects means having lots of instance variables to hold the observations, and since I’m building for Leopard, I can’t use the new associated objects for the purpose.

“Wait a minute,” you’re saying! “Leopard? Then why are you talking about using blocks?” Answer: I’m using PLBlocks.

So, armed with PLBlocks on one side, and Michael Ash’s typically brilliant code on the other, I dove in and pretty much rewrote the entire MAKVONotificationCenter to do three things it didn’t before:

  1. Block callbacks.
  2. Tagging observations with a simple integer value.
  3. Several alternative ways of specifying groups of observations to remove, based on observer, target, key path, selector, tag, or most combinations thereof.

With that done (and unit tested, and Doxygen-documented), I’m now integrating them into my revised class heirarchy for Missions itself. With any luck, I’ll have at least a screenshot of a fighter flying around before the week is out. Stay tuned, those of you who are crazy enough to stick around for all this :-).

Footnote: I was finally able to find a way to access the original model files for the game’s graphics; with some luck and a bit of help from Mike (I’m clueless when it comes to this stuff), there may be higher-quality graphics to be seen in the screenshots soon.

3 thoughts on “Missions of the Reliant: Cleaning up the wreckage of the train crash

    1. Gwynne Raskind Post author

      *shrug* Even if you did, programming on System 7 at the time didn’t exactly lend itself to object-oriented languages. You were writing in Pascal, and I don’t recall Classic ever supporting Object Pascal for serious use. Not to mention the Mac Toolbox was totally procedural. I probably wouldn’t have gone OO myself if not for Cocoa forcing it on me. I used to be a Carbon enthusiast :-).

      Reply
  1. Rubes

    Interesting, I used Turbo Pascal to program Missions which, IIRC, billed itself as a type of OO environment. I say “type of OO environment” because I think they recognized that it wasn’t /really/ OOP — sort of pseudo-OOP.

    Reply

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