Missions of the Reliant: You’ve got to know why things work on a starship.

I finally worked out the major design issues blocking the way for the command input console (also known as that tiny rectangle in the bottom right you see short messages and crew commands in) to exist. Long story short, a lot of things were being handled by the player object and the crew objects that should’ve been handled in the command console class (which didn’t exist yet). Took a bit of retooling to put everything where it belonged.

The console and computer (which I had to implement at the same time since the console depends on it being an addressable input processor) are far from finished products, to be sure. The console pretty much doesn’t work (though it does display not responding when a crew member is down), and the computer is just a framework of code so the console can operate. There really was no way to implement either one separately at this point, since the console depends on the computer and the computer has no function at all without the console. However, at this point I’ll be focusing on the console and adding the computer later, since finishing the computer involves also implementing a number of thus-far ignored displays (such as the galactic map, the ship mods and cargo screens, and the library screens), whereas finishing the console brings back functionality that was partially working before and isn’t now.

A lesson to take away from some of the snafus I’ve made during this project is to have clearly defined rules of interaction between objects early on, and to stick to them. The “responder” class which defines common functionality for anything that needs setup/teardown, mouse/key input, periodic tasking, and access to (pseudo-)global objects does not define any way of letting subclasses say “these objects here need to know about any input I don’t handle and need to be tasked when I’m tasked”, for example (and there’s no larger list of responders to iterate over), which has resulted in a number of subclasses each doing it a bit differently. It works, but it’s ugly as heck. (For the curious, the main game controller prods several top-level objects from its own responder methods, each of which tick others that they’re responsible for; it’s a mess.) I need to go back and standardize and commonalize this stuff. Why didn’t I do that before? At the time I never realized so many different objects were going to need to respond commonly to those inputs, because I hadn’t known then about all the design necessities that I do now. There just weren’t enough objects then to make it worth managing responders the way Cocoa does with NSResponder (first, previous, and next responders in a chain). Now there are.

Who knows. Maybe a certain five-digit prefix code will become an easter egg that does something interesting.

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