Rant: Security Questions Are Stupid

We’ve all heard this bit before, especially the avid readers of Bruce Schneier’s security blog, but after seeing the security questions available on a new account I created today, I just had to do my own rant.

Security questions are considered by some to be a form of “two-factor authentication”. They’re no such thing. If used to further secure login, they’re just an extra password which is almost guaranteed to be much more guessable than your usual password. If used to recover a lost password, they function to replace your password with something almost certainly less secure.

Some suggest giving nonsense answers to security questions for this reason. Of course, then you’re back where you started: You’ll never remember your answers. That’s when you could’ve remembered your answers if you answered them honestly, which is often just as impossible. And now we’re back to writing it down on paper, which negates the entire point.

Yet these stupid things are required on a majority of secure sites now. Can security auditors please stop trying to please their clients and tell them the truth about how security questions just make things worse?

The questions which prompted this rant:

  • “What was your favorite color in elementary school?” – Now, let’s assume I remember that time of my life in the first place. At which point in elementary school? Let’s say I just pick one, and let’s even more fantastically say I somehow stick to remembering which one. Most children will have said one of the colors of the rainbow. Say it with me now… “Dictionary attack”!
  • “What is the nickname of your youngest sibling?” – Suppose I don’t have any siblings. Suppose I am the youngest sibling. Suppose my youngest sibling doesn’t have a nickname. And even aside from all this, names suffer from relatively low entropy, though admittedly not as low as colors.
  • “What was your first job?” – Have I ever had a job? Am I young enough that I remember exactly which thing I did first? Do I count doing chores as a child? Do I count shoveling snow for my neighbors? Do I count internships? How do you define a “job”?
  • “What breed of dog was your first pet?” – I’ve never had a dog as a pet in my life. And that’s even after the assumption that I have a pet at all. If I did, was the first one a dog, and did I only get one dog at that time? By the way, the entropy of dog breeds is even lower than that of colors when you include all colors.
  • “What is the nickname of your oldest sibling?” – See youngest sibling.
  • “What is the name of your first pet?” – Again, suppose I have no pets. Suppose my “first” pet was one of a group. Suppose I picked an arbitrary one out of a group. Also, low entropy again.
  • “Who was your childhood hero?” – What constitutes a hero? Suppose there wasn’t someone I looked up to in childhood? Suppose there was more than one? Suppose I just don’t remember? And the entropy of a hero’s name is likely to be rather lower, on average, than that of a regular name.
  • “What was the model of your first car?” – Where do I even begin here? Did I ever own a car? Am I even old enough to drive? Do I remember its model? Do car models have any kind of entropy at all?
  • “What was the name of your earliest childhood friend?” – I had lots of friends as a child. Didn’t everyone? Suppose, more morosely, that I had none. Am I going to know which one was the earliest? And yet again, the low entropy of names.

Now, I grant, most of these are pretty silly nits. They don’t have to be accurate answers, just ones to which I can remember the answers consistently. Unfortunately, the more likely I am to remember the answers, the less likely they are to be remotely secure passwords.

Password strength doesn’t count when the answers are only one word long and chosen from a limited pool, people.

8 thoughts on “Rant: Security Questions Are Stupid

  1. Aeda

    See this is why I take the right answer, and obfuscate it by either translating it into another language I know (and adding a set letter somewhere to throw off foreign dictionary attack), or making it related but different.

    Really though I prefer sites that let me create my own darned question.

    Reply
  2. Sneakyness

    I’ve always thought of these questions as some sort of secret “key”, of which only I would know the zany reply to.

    IE: “Where did you go to school as a child?” “CHICKEN CESAR SALAD W/ RANCH”

    Reply
    1. davidrip

      @Sneakyness: FYI, you used i.e. wrong, i.e., you used i.e. where you should’ve used e.g.—e.g., it’s best to use e.g. when saying, “I like Latin abbreviations—e.g., I like i.e.”

      Reply
  3. Scott

    This rant popped in my head after yet I was forced to answer 3 ‘security’ questions, which anyone that really wanted to get access to the account good guess with less than 100 tries…

    My password, on the other hand, is about 100^100 times difficult to crack.

    Lol@ who is your childhood hero. Sad that someone can crack into
    your accounts by guessing superman, spiderman, or the hulk…

    Reply

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