Tag Archives: CPPDepend

The OCDepend saga continuums

No, the title isn’t a typo. Kudos to those who get the reference.

I received yet another response from the people at CPPDepend, and this one was both detailed and featured consideration of each of the objections I outlined in my previous posts. I am again impressed with their communication.

While I still can’t recommend the product, I’d like my readers to consider that my lack of recommendation is purely a personal choice on my part not to make use of this kind of tool, and I have no complaints left about their presentation that they haven’t addressed. I haven’t looked at the tool and I’m not qualified to say whether it’s good or bad. In short, I encourage people to look at it for themselves and make their own decision.

Come to think of it, I always encouraged that, I just had a stronger opinion of my own before. I don’t have it anymore, so just in case anyone was crazy enough to listen to me, stop it! :) I’m actually gratified to see a company out there that pays attention to and answers complaints like mine.

Obligatory disclaimer: I have received no compensation, monetary or otherwise, for posting this article, blah blah blah blah blah something something something.

More about OCDepend

A few hours after I posted about the email I got from CPPDepend, I received this response:

Hello,
I read your interesting feedback about our product posted in your blog, and what can I confirm is:

- It's not a spam, this mail was sent to only 3 people, that we consider they have a good Objective-C skill to have their valluable feedbacks.
- You are right some effort must be done for OCDepend in our website.
- Maybe I'm wrong but I dont think that OCDepend features exist in XCode, for example CQLinq is a powerful tool to request code base and enforce its quality.

If you have time to test the product it will help us a lot to improve the product,

Best Regards.

Dane.

Here is my response:

Hi Dane,

Please note, in the interest of full disclosure, that I have also posted this response on my blog for my readers to see.

First, I’d like to say that I’m impressed. Not everyone would bother to take the time to respond to comments like the ones I made, and considering how “form letter” the first email was, I’m doubly gratified to see a personally addressed response the second time around.

I’m still somewhat troubled that the original email read very much like marketing spam. Thank you for contacting me and for considering my opinion valuable, but in my opinion, sending a generic email that doesn’t say anything about why I’m receiving it or give me any sense that it was even intended for me is a very poor way to ask me to review your product. Since you did take the time to respond to me, however, I will offer these additional thoughts:

The value of the pro license you offered in your first email, USD $500, is by itself something I would not recommend to any Objective-C developer in the first place. Mac developers, particularly the smaller ones like myself, are not as used to such high-cost licensing schemes as you’ve probably come to expect from your Windows customers. I certainly wouldn’t consider buying something that expensive unless I had very certain and solid proof that it was going to save me a significant amount of time over the tools Xcode already provides.

Without actually looking at the product itself (and I’ll emphasize to other readers, I have not looked at OCDepend itself and can offer no direct judgements about it), I have browsed your website considerably, and I have to say again: It is entirely lacking. As a developer, I read the phrase “CppDepend and OCDepend are based on Clang for more reliability.” and immediately dismiss it as nonsense. It turns me off, severely so. Basing something on Clang does not intrinsically make it reliable; it only means you have access to the exact same system upon which modern versions of Xcode are built! And Xcode itself shows that it’s extremely possible to be based on Clang and still be horribly unreliable.

Your cited feature that makes OCDepend so much better than Xcode is this “CQLinq” language that allows for querying of my code. To what end, exactly? To “request code base”? Assuming I understand your intended meaning, this means I can get information about my code in query-language form. I presume “enforce its quality” refers to something like putting this query language in a Git commit hook or other such script to check that conventions are being followed. Your website cites CQLinq as being “for maximum flexibility”, which is meaningless if it’s actually your flagship feature; that phrase makes it sound more like an add-on for advanced users. I don’t mean to make light of your English, and if I’m doing so, I apologize, but I can’t see what this feature is meant to do for me. Your website gives the following example:

from m in Application.Methods  
where m.NbLinesOfCode >  30  && m.IsPublic
select m

Which returns all public methods longer than 30 lines of code. So, I have to learn a new domain-specific language applicable solely to your product in order to do something that’s ill-defined at best to begin with. What is a line of code? Do blank lines count? Lines consisting only of an opening or closing brace? Comments? Preprocessor macros? Macros that delete code under certain conditions? To say nothing of the fact that Objective-C doesn’t have the concept of non-public methods.

CppDepend also advertises its ability to compare builds. Any developer who needs to do this is almost certainly already using Git or Mercurial (or some other VCS) to do so for free. For tracking builds in the wild there are such tools as HockeyApp, Crashlytics, and TestFlight. CppDepend’s dependency graphing already exists in Xcode, and quite frankly, most of its other features for code quality look like something of interest purely to managers more concerned with metrics than functionality. No developers with whom I’ve ever personally worked in Objective-C (my personal experience only, that of others will almost certainly differ) have worried about metrics like these. They’re more the subject of The Daily WTF articles!

In summation, from what I can see without downloading your product, I can’t imagine I’d ever give it a second glance. It is obviously true that my experience may be atypical, that there may be much more useful features in your product that are not listed on your website, that I’m simply in a bad mood today, or any number of other explanations for my disinterest. I remain very much open to being proven wrong, and I look forward to that possibility, but as it stands I could not recommend this product to anybody (again, for those others reading, I haven’t in fact downloaded it at all, so take it with a grain of salt). I would see the price tag and immediately veer towards the tools I already have unless yours could quickly and convincingly show me that it was better for the job.

— Gwynne Raskind

A short note on CPPDepend/OCDepend

This morning, I got an email from someone purporting to be from something called “OCDepend”, which turns out to be some kind of tool for using Clang to analyze Objective-C code.

Basically, the static analyzer with a bit of GUI and a LINQ language for looking at your code, from what I can tell.

There’s not a single screenshot of the Objective-C version on their website, and I’m not about to download a tool which:

  1. Is so desperate that they’re sending out free pro license offers to random people with an email form letter in hope of a good blog review.
  2. Has absolutely no documentation on the website, which is purely about the C++ version of the tool for Windows.
  3. Sends the aforementioned email from an address which appears nowhere on their website but at the same time isn’t a personal name; it came from just “developer”@.
  4. From what I can tell, duplicates functionality that’s been built into Xcode for some time now, and provides nothing else beyond a query language for information that Xcode also shows.

I would strongly suggest to these people that they look over their marketing and consider carefully what they’re really providing to their supposed Mac customers before sending out unsolicited emails with bad grammar and poorly qualified From addresses.

P.S.: I looked over the email carefully and it doesn’t appear to just be random spam, but if it is, my apologies to CPPDepend.

P.P.S.: The full text of the email I received, in case someone can tell me I’ve lost my mind and/or am overreacting:

Return-Path: <cppdepend AT gmail DOT com>
Sender: cppdepend AT gmail DOT com
Date: Thu, 7 Mar 2013 14:06:27 +0000
Subject: Managing Objective-C code quality using OCDepend
From: developer <developer AT cppdepend DOT com>
To: REDACTED
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary=f46d0444ee1f73edc604d7563650

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Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi,

I'm Dane the Community Manager for OCDepend Tool.

*OCDepend* is a static analysis tool that simplifies managing Objective-C
code quality and provides a highly flexible code query language. Please
find more detailed features here : *http://www.cppdepend.com/Features.aspx*

I=92ll be pleased to offer you a pro licence, so that you can try OCDepend
and blog about it if you find it useful.

I=92ll send you a pro licence as soon as I receive your confirmation.

Some of OCDepend=92s key functionalities :


   - Code Query language(CQLinq), with visual tools/editors
   - Compare Builds
   - More than 80 Code Metrics
   - Display analysis results in different types of Diagrams
   - Easy integration to Build process
   - Detailed and highly customized reports
   - Facilitate Code Reviews by using Code Change Metrics
   - Visual Editor that gives many views (Code Query Builder, Dependency
   Graph, Matrix and Metrics views ++)


Best Regards!
Dane,
OCDepend Developer & Community Manager.

--f46d0444ee1f73edc604d7563650
Content-Type: text/html; charset=windows-1252
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<div dir=3D"ltr"><div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;backgroun=
d-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Hi,</font></di=
v><div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255=
,255,255)">
<font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div style=3D"color:rgb=
(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font face=3D"=
verdana, sans-serif">I&#39;m Dane the Community Manager for OCDepend Tool.<=
/font></div>
<div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,2=
55,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif"><br></font></div><div style=3D"=
background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif"><font=
 color=3D"#222222"><b>OCDepend</b> is a static analysis tool that simplifie=
s managing Objective-C code quality and provides a highly flexible code que=
ry language. Please find more detailed features here :=A0</font><span style=
=3D"background-color:transparent"><font color=3D"#1155cc"><u><a href=3D"htt=
p://www.cppdepend.com/Features.aspx">http://www.cppdepend.com/Features.aspx=
</a></u></font></span></font></div>
<div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,2=
55,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">=A0</font></div><div style=3D"c=
olor:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font =
face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">I=92ll be pleased to offer you a pro licence, =
so that you can try OCDepend and blog about it if you find it useful.</font=
></div>
<div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,2=
55,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">=A0</font></div><div style=3D"c=
olor:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font =
face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">I=92ll send you a pro licence as soon as I rec=
eive your confirmation.</font></div>
<div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,2=
55,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">=A0</font></div><div style=3D"c=
olor:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font =
face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Some of OCDepend=92s key functionalities :</fo=
nt></div>
<div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,2=
55,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">=A0</font></div><div style=3D"c=
olor:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><ul st=
yle>
<li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Code Query language(CQLinq), w=
ith visual tools/editors</font></li><li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-s=
erif">Compare Builds</font></li><li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif=
">More than 80 Code Metrics</font></li>
<li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Display analysis results in di=
fferent types of Diagrams</font></li><li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-=
serif">Easy integration to Build process</font></li><li style><font face=3D=
"verdana, sans-serif">Detailed and highly customized reports</font></li>
<li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Facilitate Code Reviews by usi=
ng Code Change Metrics</font></li><li style><font face=3D"verdana, sans-ser=
if">Visual Editor that gives many views (Code Query Builder, Dependency Gra=
ph, Matrix and Metrics views ++)</font></li>
</ul></div><div style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-colo=
r:rgb(255,255,255)"><font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif"><br></font></div><di=
v style=3D"color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,=
255)">
<font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Best Regards!</font></div><div style=3D"=
color:rgb(34,34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)"><font=
 face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">Dane,</font></div><div style=3D"color:rgb(34,=
34,34);font-size:13px;background-color:rgb(255,255,255)">
<font face=3D"verdana, sans-serif">OCDepend Developer &amp; Community Manag=
er.</font></div></div>

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